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Llama Trips 2018-04-01T18:32:58+00:00

Llama Treks

Two Rivers Fishing Company sits at the foot of the largest mountain range in Wyoming, the Wind River Range. A premier backpacking, climbing, and backcountry fishing destination, the Winds span over 140 miles from tip to tail. With the Continental Divide running the entire length of the range, the Winds claim 19 of Wyoming’s 20 highest peaks, including Gannett Peak, the highest-topping the charts at 13, 804 feet. They are also home to over 180 active glaciers, including the largest glaciers in the American Rockies. With over 1,500 alpine lakes, unbeatable night skies, and some of the most untouched natural wild landscapes the US has to offer, what are you waiting for? For a truly memorable adventure, visit the Wind River Range on a guided llama-packing trek, and experience the most breathtaking scenery Wyoming has to offer.

3-Day Llama Trek

$883 per person

Our 3-day llama treks offer great glimpses into the Winds for weekend warriors. With light to moderate day hikes and 2 overnights in the backcountry, this option fits the bill for those folks not wanting to cover a lot of miles each day and for those who aren’t into the longer backcountry stints that leave everyone smelling like their new llama friends by the end.

Llama River Crossing

5-Day Llama Trek

$1472 per person

5-day llama excursions dive deeper into the Wind River Range backcountry for a true wilderness experience. With 4 nights, we are able to move camp for a great change of scenery as we approach the rugged Continental Divide. 5 full days of exploration and fishing provide ample opportunities to ensure your Wind River adventure is as unforgettable as the terrain.

Llama Hike

Choose Your Own Adventure

$ Itinerary Dependent

Love the idea of a llama trek but want to make a trip custom-tailored just for you and your group? Contact us and we can work together to plan the perfect itinerary!

Silver Creek

When: July 27-29, 2018

Where: Silver Creek

Difficulty: Easy

An easy, nearly flat, two-mile hike to a shady and secluded campsite surrounded by desert. An ideal spot to hunt for deer sheds and just sit and relax in the wilderness for a great two days.

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Big Sandy

When: August 10-12, 2018

Where: Big Sandy

Difficulty: Moderate-Strenuous

A moderate six-mile hike with small 500-foot change in elevation to a campsite near Big Sandy Lake. An early start the next morning to Mitchell Peak will cover about 3,000 feet of elevation gain on mostly off-trail terrain, leading to a Cirque of the Towers overlook.  Fishing at a nearby lake is possible.

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Big Sandy

When: August 10-12, 2018

Where: Big Sandy

Difficulty: Moderate-Strenuous

A moderate six-mile hike with small 500-foot change in elevation to a campsite near Big Sandy Lake. An early start the next morning to Mitchell Peak will cover about 3,000 feet of elevation gain on mostly off-trail terrain, leading to a Cirque of the Towers overlook.  Fishing at a nearby lake is possible.

Learn More

Titcomb Basin

When: TBA

Where: Titcomb Basin

Difficulty: Moderate

The Wind River Range’s crown jewel is Titcomb Basin. A gradually uphill hike over two days to set up a campsite near the Continental Divide. Plenty of exploration, sightseeing and fishing opportunities are available across this entire trek.

Coming Soon…

FAQ

What’s included in a llama trek? 2018-04-01T17:53:54+00:00

Every guided llama trip includes a CPR and First Aid certified guide, llama(s), food (which we will prepare for you), bear-proof food storage, First Aid kit, and a Spot satellite communicator. Bear deterrent, tents, pads, sleeping bags, fly rods and other equipment are available to rent at an additional cost (check with us to reserve).

What should I pack for a llama trek? 2018-08-18T16:48:03+00:00

When you register for your llama pack trip you will receive a packet of information, including a pack list with both recommended and required gear. Remember, weight limits are strict, so pack with that in mind. Going over on the weight limit is not an option. You can check out the gear list here. Rental equipment is available-contact us to reserve.

What should I expect on a llama trek? 2018-08-18T16:48:39+00:00

The Wind River Range is notorious for its rugged, rocky terrain and its beauty. Trailhead elevations range from between 8,000-9,200 feet, and our hikes can go up to 11,000 feet or more, so you should expect to feel effects of altitude (such as shortness of breath) if you are not acclimated. The trails are frequently uneven, rocky, and narrow-sturdy hiking boots or shoes are required. We will hike around 5-8 miles per day, depending on the terrain. Each party member must have at least a moderate level of cardiovascular fitness. Expect to cover at least 2 miles per hour. Each person should plan on carrying a light daypack with some food, 2-3 liters of water, rain gear and personal effects, while the llamas will carry the remaining equipment. There are gear requirements and restrictions, especially as relates to weight. These must be followed precisely-no exceptions. You will receive a packing list upon registration-you can also see it here.

I’m nervous about using llamas. Can you tell me more about them? 2018-04-01T17:52:51+00:00

Llamas (Lama glama) are members of the Camelid family-cousins to the one-humped and two-humped camel. Llamas typically weigh anywhere from 250 to 500 pounds and walk at an average pace of 2 miles per hour. Llamas can usually carry around 65 pounds for long trips, but are capable of carrying up to 25% of their body weight. Their soft, padded feet allow them to go through a variety of terrain with ease and also take less of a toll on our hiking trails than horses and mules.

Llamas are not strict grazers, but are considered browsers. They will chew on a tree or a bush as well as any grass they come across the trail. They have a very efficient digestive system that allows them to extract more nutrients from the food. Treats are encouraged, as any animal trainer would recommend, especially as a reward for good behavior and a hard day’s work.

Their eye placement allows them to see both in front and behind them, which is a plus for predator detection, but it does make them a bit head shy. Llamas do enjoy a good petting, but they prefer to be pet on their necks or backs. As with any large animal, a calm, quiet and consistent demeanor is best when working with them.

And, as far as the thing you really want to know about: yes, they do spit, but its generally at each other-not at people. Llamas are social herd animals and there is a social ranking for dominance. However, a llama’s position on the social ladder is always subject to change, and spitting is often used as a control method within the herd. It is possible to get in the crossfire, but most spitting episodes are feuds over food, when another llama touches them uninvited, or if they feel threatened (think of small children on a road trip, sharing the backseat). Rest assured that well-trained, properly-packed llamas can be one of the most enjoyable companions in the backcountry.

What is your cancellation policy for llama treks? 2018-04-01T17:53:27+00:00
A 50% deposit is required to secure a reservation within 7 days of booking your trip. In case of a cancellation, the deposit is fully refundable less a $200 processing fee per person if the written cancellation request is received prior to 90 days of the trip date. For cancellations within 90-60 days of arrival, the deposit is non-refundable. Requests to move an already scheduled trip date will be treated as a cancellation and a new booking. The balance of the trip is due within 60 days of the trip. If a cancellation must be made within 60 days of arrival no refund will be issued. Due to the nature of permitting required for advanced bookings in the National Forest and Wilderness, we can not make exceptions to our cancellation policy. Wyoming weather is often variable-trips will not be cancelled due to adverse weather conditions. If you are at all concerned with the cancellation possibility, we strongly encourage you to purchase trip insurance. Unexpected events do arise and travel insurance is very reasonable. There are many good travel insurance providers, but we recommend Travelguard as a good option.  You can either complete the online quote on their website or call one of their agents.

 

 

FAQ

What’s included in a llama trek? 2018-04-01T17:53:54+00:00

Every guided llama trip includes a CPR and First Aid certified guide, llama(s), food (which we will prepare for you), bear-proof food storage, First Aid kit, and a Spot satellite communicator. Bear deterrent, tents, pads, sleeping bags, fly rods and other equipment are available to rent at an additional cost (check with us to reserve).

What should I pack for a llama trek? 2018-08-18T16:48:03+00:00

When you register for your llama pack trip you will receive a packet of information, including a pack list with both recommended and required gear. Remember, weight limits are strict, so pack with that in mind. Going over on the weight limit is not an option. You can check out the gear list here. Rental equipment is available-contact us to reserve.

What should I expect on a llama trek? 2018-08-18T16:48:39+00:00

The Wind River Range is notorious for its rugged, rocky terrain and its beauty. Trailhead elevations range from between 8,000-9,200 feet, and our hikes can go up to 11,000 feet or more, so you should expect to feel effects of altitude (such as shortness of breath) if you are not acclimated. The trails are frequently uneven, rocky, and narrow-sturdy hiking boots or shoes are required. We will hike around 5-8 miles per day, depending on the terrain. Each party member must have at least a moderate level of cardiovascular fitness. Expect to cover at least 2 miles per hour. Each person should plan on carrying a light daypack with some food, 2-3 liters of water, rain gear and personal effects, while the llamas will carry the remaining equipment. There are gear requirements and restrictions, especially as relates to weight. These must be followed precisely-no exceptions. You will receive a packing list upon registration-you can also see it here.

I’m nervous about using llamas. Can you tell me more about them? 2018-04-01T17:52:51+00:00

Llamas (Lama glama) are members of the Camelid family-cousins to the one-humped and two-humped camel. Llamas typically weigh anywhere from 250 to 500 pounds and walk at an average pace of 2 miles per hour. Llamas can usually carry around 65 pounds for long trips, but are capable of carrying up to 25% of their body weight. Their soft, padded feet allow them to go through a variety of terrain with ease and also take less of a toll on our hiking trails than horses and mules.

Llamas are not strict grazers, but are considered browsers. They will chew on a tree or a bush as well as any grass they come across the trail. They have a very efficient digestive system that allows them to extract more nutrients from the food. Treats are encouraged, as any animal trainer would recommend, especially as a reward for good behavior and a hard day’s work.

Their eye placement allows them to see both in front and behind them, which is a plus for predator detection, but it does make them a bit head shy. Llamas do enjoy a good petting, but they prefer to be pet on their necks or backs. As with any large animal, a calm, quiet and consistent demeanor is best when working with them.

And, as far as the thing you really want to know about: yes, they do spit, but its generally at each other-not at people. Llamas are social herd animals and there is a social ranking for dominance. However, a llama’s position on the social ladder is always subject to change, and spitting is often used as a control method within the herd. It is possible to get in the crossfire, but most spitting episodes are feuds over food, when another llama touches them uninvited, or if they feel threatened (think of small children on a road trip, sharing the backseat). Rest assured that well-trained, properly-packed llamas can be one of the most enjoyable companions in the backcountry.

What is your cancellation policy for llama treks? 2018-04-01T17:53:27+00:00
A 50% deposit is required to secure a reservation within 7 days of booking your trip. In case of a cancellation, the deposit is fully refundable less a $200 processing fee per person if the written cancellation request is received prior to 90 days of the trip date. For cancellations within 90-60 days of arrival, the deposit is non-refundable. Requests to move an already scheduled trip date will be treated as a cancellation and a new booking. The balance of the trip is due within 60 days of the trip. If a cancellation must be made within 60 days of arrival no refund will be issued. Due to the nature of permitting required for advanced bookings in the National Forest and Wilderness, we can not make exceptions to our cancellation policy. Wyoming weather is often variable-trips will not be cancelled due to adverse weather conditions. If you are at all concerned with the cancellation possibility, we strongly encourage you to purchase trip insurance. Unexpected events do arise and travel insurance is very reasonable. There are many good travel insurance providers, but we recommend Travelguard as a good option.  You can either complete the online quote on their website or call one of their agents.

 

 

Plan Your Wind River Llama Adventure Today

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